‘Tis the Season!

Welcome one and all!

You dread – I mean…read – correctly. Another Bar Exam is upon us and for those who have not started studying early, Bar Prep is just around the corner.

But before I jump into substantive posts, polls, etc., I do want to belatedly wish a big CONGRATULATIONS to all the bar examinees who passed the July Bar Exam!

Next, I want to tell those who may not have passed in July that regardless of the number of times you have taken it, whether that was your first or fifteenth time not passing, what matters is that you are here. Meaning that if you are reading this, I am assuming you are taking the upcoming Bar Exam (I believe all registration deadlines have passed by now), which I can only assume means you have found that determination and drive to go it again. I would also point out that by having taken the exam previously, you do have a bit of an advantage in that you know what to expect on the exam days, you have become intimately familiar with the format of the exam, and hopefully you found some things that either worked better for your own personal studying and/or found things that do not work for you.

People study and absorb material effectively in different ways, and if that means that the traditional bar prep program is not your thing or their schedule was not effective for you or whatever the case may be, the important thing is that you remember that the Bar Exam is not an IQ test and it does not represent your knowledge of the law. Think about it: you could be absolutely brilliant at criminal law, constitutional law, and property law, etc. (you get the picture) but that does not mean there will be essays on those topics. Furthermore, you could be brilliant in a subject, got an A+ in law school, etc., but maybe there are some MBE questions that fall into the one single subcategory of a subtopic of a subject. In other words, not passing the bar exam (note/tip: take the word ‘fail’ out of your vocabulary) is not a reflection on your intelligence or abilities as a lawyer. One last point to illustrate this/some food for thought: If you went to law school to be a litigator – private or public, it doesn’t matter – where precisely are your skills as a litigator tested? To the extent that one could argue those skills are tested, how analogous is that to a real life scenario? Does a 90 minute MPT or a 30 minute essay really reflect your best briefs, allow you to show your courtroom demeanor and strategies? In real life are you ever going to be disallowed from doing something that you were likely taught to do in law school – shepardizing, researching, staying abreast of the newest law etc.? I think these are points to remember and think on if you are repeating the exam. Do not let the past define your future, do not let this exam turn into more of a monster than it already is. It is just a hurdle you need overcome to get to the place you want to be, and every single one of you can pass this time around.

That said, repeat takers and first time takers alike, welcome and stay tuned for additional tips and tricks, supplement reviews, discount codes, alternate ideas or study strategies, and more!

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