Home Stretch – Bar Exam Crunch Time Advice

First, thank you to everyone who responded to the survey/poll! Apologies for my delayed post, but I realized making the last day of the survey before my post the day of the big game was foolish, so I allowed for more responses through yesterday. The results are below:

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I am going to start with the easiest two groups first:
To the 6.9% of people that were at 85% or higher whether you hit it on January 31st when I first put the poll out or February 5th: I have no advice for you other than to continue practicing and reviewing. To be honest, I am in awe of you for reaching that percentage with four weeks to three weeks to go until the exam and you should be proud and feel good about going into the exam, because you killed it.

To the 31% who are on track: You are in an excellent position, you have likely hit your prep company’s pass percentage statistic or will shortly, and are on pace to finish probably a week ahead of time, if I recall correctly (obviously this is a generalization, a 20% range is fairly large). You have done enough to clearly see where your strengths and weaknesses are, so take advantage of any free time, either after you hit your goal percentage (theoretically everyone wants to hit 100%, but I think generally speaking we can agree hitting the pass statistic is satisfactory and also it can be borderline impossible to hit 100%) or simply when you are not doing the end of your bar prep assignments, hit those weaknesses. If you are not good at MPT’s for example, perhaps listen to a lecture again or go through an outline or read an example and sample answer from a prior exam or exams. As I have mentioned before and will discuss below, there are different ways to pass the UBE depending on your strengths, where you focus, and so on. However, you too should be entering the exam comfortable with the percentage completion you achieved.

To the approximately 27.6% who are or at the time of answering were between 45 and 65%, keep calm and study on. You still have 20 days to hit your par company pass statistic and bear in mind that you do and will remember more on test day than you think you do now. Trust me, you will be surprised. With that said, if possible continue on your program while targeting your weak areas; for example, instead of completing a multiple choice set, if you are not doing well on your essays or certain essay-only topics, opt for a practice or graded essay on the topic.

For the roughly 34.5% who answered either 25-35% (which was a typo, the 3 was meant to be a 4) or “Not talking about it,” either because you are 1. uncontrollably nervous regardless of how much you completed; 2.  Didn’t fall into a range because I had a typo; or 3. Feel as though Bar Prep has messed you up or confused you more or you just had a lot of circumstances arise that prevented you from studying, some tips:

  1. Depending on which company you have, you probably have had lecturers tell you that the Bar Exam is not a law school exam. They mean this predominantly regarding the standard (it is one of minimum competency, rather than a fight for the A+), in some circumstances, the form some questions take, MPT’s, and so on, do not let that undermine your confidence – the bar exam IS still like a law school exam/exams, or it was when I graduated a few years back. Multiple choice questions? Still “Pick the BEST answer.” Essay Writing? Still IRAC format (or some people use CRIAC or IRAirac, whichever) and still use headings as appropriate, still apply the rule to the facts at hand, etc. MPT’s? First year legal writing, you did memo’s and/or briefs and so forth. Since then, you have (presumably) worked in the field, honed your skills with your experience and your continued academic work. You know how to formulate a rule, you know how to write persuasively or objectively and the indicators for each. In other words, in some ways the Bar Exam is like or tests on skills you already developed in law school. My suggestions would be to enter the exam with your head held high and at the very least, you know it will be or has been a learning experience. But as the saying goes, don’t count your chickens before they hatch.
  2. Think about Different Ways to Slice the Cheesecake: Sorry, I was going to say pie or pizza but cheesecake feels more up my alley tonight. But as I have discussed before, the exam can be “sliced” different ways and logically speaking if you know your weaknesses and strengths, you still have time to tailor your studying method to one. For example, if you hate and do not get or do well on MPT’s, focus on “the Big 7” or the MBE topics and the MEE topics and get in as much practice and review as possible on both. Issue spot, do practice question sets, do practice essays and then compare them to sample answers. You can even buy last July’s Bar Exam Essay Questions and model answers with their grade breakdown from the National Conference of Bar Examiners study aid store for $20.00 and instant access via a downloadable file. If you want to see how the examiners grade or how answers are structured, I would recommend doing this. Note: The MBE and MEE account for 80% of your score; you can theoretically pass the exam if you kill those portions. The same is theoretically true if you are uncomfortable with MEE essays or a particular topic but like or are good at MPT’s – the MBE and MPT portion account for 70% of your score, and it would be nearly (I mean, you would have to try..) impossible for you to get a 0 on every MEE essay. Further, it is reasonable to assume that the interactions between some of the MBE topics and MEE topics and a review of past UBE’s that at least 10% (2 MEE essays or – more likely – possibly 4 hybrid essays) of your MEE score will come from MBE topics.
  3. Know the Bar Exam “Rules” cold: You should know by now that, for example, in criminal law assume common law applies unless stated otherwise, know that you are to assume pure comparative negligence unless otherwise stated, etc.
  4. Use different study techniques and tools and talk to other people – not about how far they are, not about who got what done, but just the law – auditory and conversational learners in particular can benefit from doing so.
  5. Invent mnemonics, acronyms, phrases etc. that work for you if you do not remember the short cuts, songs, phrases, acronyms, or songs that your bar prep program used. For example, some of mine: Specific Intent Crimes are a CATS BAFFFLER. Yes, I threw in an extra ‘f’ and yes, that is a silly memory device, but it works and I remember it (specific intent crimes are Conspiracy, Attempt, Solicitation, Burglary, Assault, First Degree Murder, Forgery, False Pretenses, Larceny, Embezzlement, Robbery). Need another example? I studied General Intent crimes in MKRIB (General Intent Crimes are Manslaughter, Kidnapping, Rape, False Imprisonment, and Battery.
  6. Take advantage of supplemental materials you have/purchased that are simpler to understand (for you) or are shorter and more concise if you are feeling the pressure with 20 days to go.
  7. Regardless of the above, practice, practice, review, and practice more. If actively interacting with material helps your recall, then by all means make your own diagrams or flowcharts, miniature outlines in a sequential format, and so on. Don’t stop there either. Write down side notes or things you recall in margins, color code things, highlight – anything that works for you and keeps you engaged with the material.

Finally, if you have other questions, remember you are not alone. There is a facebook group consisting of law students, bar examinees, and attorney’s that you can join/be invited to, you can comment or reach out to your bar prep company or a supplemental company, you can comment here, on twitter, on facebook – these days, communication is definitely not an issue. I may be uploading more materials but at this point I am not sure how useful doing so would be.

In the event that you find my tips terribly unhelpful, simply keep doing what you already know works for you. In the event that we (person to person) do not speak prior to the exam, I wish you all the best of luck and encourage you to go into the exam as optimistically and confidently as possible!

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You Have Come This Far, Don’t Fear the Bar

As this is the approximate halfway mark into your bar examination studies I feel that it is prudent to remind students not to freak out. Yes, the study period is half over…which means you still have half of the study period to go and plenty of time to complete assignments, practice questions, do practice exams, and so forth.

While Bar Prep is not known for being fun or stress-free, it is important to remember the concept of mind over matter and shifting your perspective so that the Bar Exam is not your worst nightmare or a monster come test day. Now, I am not saying that it will be a dream or your best friend  – that would be a lie. But be diligent in your studies and go into the exam with the best frame of mind possible, knowing that you can pass the exam and you have prepared for it, and success will be just around the corner.

Lastly, I had a person ask me about tips I posted a little while ago. They asked with a healthy skepticism the why and how about my song/nursery rhyme tips. The why is because it can be almost fun and when put to a well known song or poem or nursery rhyme, quite memorable. The how? Well, without further ado, here is an example of one I somewhat embarrassingly wrote to the immortal tune of “Ice Ice Baby”:

Alright stop – adjudicate and listen, Brandeis is here with a landmark opinion,
Could be on free speech or right to privacy,
Olmstead, Louisville, even Erie don’t scare me,
Can you forum shop?
Under Erie, hell no,
Avoid inequity too, ‘n then go
To the extreme ‘cause exam day is comin’
Know Jurisdiction, pleadings, and how to motion,
Brandeis-eis baby Brandeis-eis baby….

Torts
Let’s talk the Intentional,
Startin’ with battery to be conventional,
Find intent, act, causation; go analytical,
Establish intent and look for contact,
Harmful or offensive and caused by D’s act,
Remember transferred intent,
Proof of damage? Not required,
But remember consent,
If it’s in a problem, yo don’t sweat it,
It’s a defense if in the scope and valid,
express consent baby, implied consent yeah baby,
both count, both count,
express and implied consent  yeah baby,
both count, both count.

Before anyone asks, no, I am not currently signed to a record label despite my undeniable talents

Studicata – An APPetizing Bar Supplement: Product Review & Discount

Hi All,

I apologize for the cheesy pun of the title, but I just had to do it. Anyway, I have updated my product review for Studicata to actually add something quite useful about their App. The new text regarding the App has been added to my previous review in blue below, so if you have seen my initial review, just scroll down to note the additional comments.

Studicata Product Review and Discount Code

Product Type: Study supplement/aid, rule drilling, issue spotting for the MBE, UBE/MEE, and California Bar Exams. If you already know about Studicata and are simply looking for the discount code, it is: UBESTUDYING and will save you 20% off of your purchase.

  • I have classified this as a study supplement because while the product is phenomenal, there are no practice or graded essays to gauge your score. However, it is excellent for understanding and memorizing rules and issue spotting, which will serve examinees well on the essay portion

Who is it for? Examinees sitting for the UBE/MEE, or the California Bar Exam (35 states, plus Guam, Mariana Islands, Palau, and the Virgin Islands). To see the full list of jurisdictions, click HERE.

Rating: 4.75/5 stars

Mobile App: Yes, for flashcards.

What is it and What do you get? Studicata is a 3-in-1 product that includes detailed outlines (“Attack Outlines”), Flashcards, and short Summaries. In their words, you attack, drill, and master with each product, respectively.

Attack Outlines: The attack outlines cover every testable subject and its sub-topics in a well-organized, logical order and include the proper/necessary legal terminology, but in my opinion, are also worded in such a way as to promote understanding a concept rather than merely providing something to attempt to memorize. Understanding is key to the analysis and application of a rule, be it an essay or an MBE fact pattern.

  • The attack outlines are also beautiful in contrast to the black and white of bar prep company outlines, with color on topic headings and a colored scale ranging from orange to blue to grey, which shows the test frequency (and arguably the importance) of a rule or concept based on research conducted by Studicata of past Bar Exams. This is certainly where I would recommend starting. Remarkably, the attack outlines are also substantially shorter than the two outline books that bar prep companies send to you – my attack outline document is just under 200 pages, which I believe equates to roughly 3 MBE topic outlines.

The Flashcards come in 3 different PDF files which give you different options on how to print them (i.e. front and back, foldable, etc.) and comes with an app. They are therefore exceptionally easy to print, and you can bring them wherever you go through the app.

  • Flashcards come for every topic testable on the UBE (MBE and MEE) and presumably for every topic tested in California and other territories. One of the great things about the flashcards is that they do not just cover rules and concepts, but there are also cards that focus solely on issues and gateway issues. In other words, Studicata has incorporated issue spotting and how certain analyses go into their flashcards. Thus, on top of drilling the rules, exceptions, and concepts, you can drill issue spotting and analysis, all of which are important to your essay writing.
  • The App: I am so impressed with the app that Studicata has developed that I feel the need to comment on it separately. This app comes with several different modes that are useful and allow the user to use several or a single study method to learn, including allowing the user to create custom study sets and even allow you to create folders to organize said study sets. The first study mode is Learn, where the user chooses a topic and goes through a set of flashcards, reading the substance of the card (be it a rule or an issue) and then the user must choose from 4 possible answers as to what the substance is. If you get a card incorrect, it alerts you and shows you the card a second time immediately thereafter for review. The next mode is Flashcards, which is the most like using physical flash cards – you read one side, swipe, and read the other. This mode also allows the user to “favorite” flashcards and for audio learners, you can click a button and the app will read the card to you. Write mode also has audio, or you can not turn your volume off and simply read one side of the flashcard, and you type (or “write”) the concept, rule, etc. and enter your answer. If you get one incorrect, it shows the correct answer and requires you to type it before moving on, which is another excellent way to retain information. Match mode shows a total of 12 cards (6 for one side, 6 for the other) and the user must match the name of the rule, statute, etc., with its definition. This may sound too easy, as process of elimination or carefully reading the cards would allow the user to figure out the match. While that may be true, I submit to you that that approach can help you learn. However, there is a catch: you are timed, so you have the time pressure component and can try to go faster each time. Not only is this a somewhat fun exercise, particularly in the context of studying for the Bar Exam, but in this blogger’s opinion the timer bringing in a speed component will prove fruitful when time demands you to recall rules or spot issues. Finally, there is Test mode, which is self-explanatory, but the user can customize the number of questions, whether you are tested by term or definition, and whether you want to answer by multiple choice, writing, or true/false (see below – click the thumbnail images to open a new tab and view full sized)

    UPDATE: After playing around a with the app a little more, I wanted to make mention of a feature I had yet to discover upon posting my initial review. The Studicata App allows you to set a test date (or, should you want to, an earlier date). By setting a test date and beginning your review of a topic on the app, the app will then send notifications based on your test date as a reminder to study or review for a certain topic. I am not sure as to what criteria goes into sending along a notification, but I would recommend starting at different times rather than going into the settings and setting every topic up at the same time. I did the latter after I had played around with the app on contracts, and I get reminders for all of those topics at the same time. However, I think (I could be wrong but I am sure a Studicata representative would be happy to answer this) that if you do the topics as they come up in your bar prep program or your bar study schedule, then you should theoretically get reminders at different times, as it does remind me to do contracts at a different time than all the other topics. Regardless of the methodology behind the reminders and days until your test, it is undoubtedly a helpful feature that – at least as of this past summer – even some bar prep program apps do not have (and I used one of the main/major companies).

Summaries: The summaries are condensed 2 to 4 page per subject summaries that list off the rules you should know and have memorized and therefore are not only good for their condensed nature but can be used in a number of ways. I know some people who used them towards the end of studying to make up for perhaps not studying as much or as hard as one should have on a topic or were used in the same manner due to the fact that studying for the bar can be difficult in and of itself, but life happens; if you get sick and are out of commission or there is a family emergency or something else that may throw a wrench in your study pattern, and thus this could be a fast way of catching up. However, I liked to use the summaries not only as review but as a checklist. I would put a check next to a rule that I had memorized, and highlight or circle any that I misunderstood or had not entirely memorized, which I found to be a very useful self-assessment tool.

Purchasing the Product: Examinees may purchase all 3 (or 4, counting the app) products separately for $97.00 each, or get the full package/ 3-in-1 bundle for $165 dollars, which saves more than $125.00. However, you can save more money with our special discount code.

DISCOUNT CODE: To save even more, whether you bundle or only purchase 1 product, enter the 20% discount code UBESTUDYING (savings vary depending on how and what you purchase).

What do I get out of it? Nothing. I have no professional or fiscal affiliation with Studicata and do not gain any monetary benefit from posting this review or promoting their product – I chose to do this on my own.

Have Questions? If you have any further or more nuanced questions regarding Studicata, I would encourage you to visit their Homepage and use the chat function to speak to a member of their team.

Bar Exam Tips Strategies and What is to Come

Hello Bar Examinees and Visitors,

First, I want to apologize for not uploading the Contracts materials or updating my Product Review as I stated I would the other day. I have (very unfortunately) gotten the flu, but look for them in the near future – the review as early as tomorrow, since I had already started making updates to it.

Second, I received a question regarding strategies I have suggested in the past or if I have any “original” strategies to suggest. At the moment I cannot think of any original strategies in particular, but I polled a couple of friends and I have a list of the non-traditional study methods that you may have used in law school but are likely presenting themselves for the first time in the context of Bar Prep.

      1. Mnemonics;
      2. Analogies (fictional – tv series, movies, books)
      3. Analogies (based on real life experiences)
      4. Short songs/nursery rhymes
      5. Altering song lyrics
        ^This can actually be  quite amusing and border on fun
      6. Identify your weak areas, take time to understand the rules, write them down in your own words, and read them aloud
      7. Group Study/Discussion (Note: If you would like to do this, you may do so here – obviously – or in a group on facebook with 1,000+ member; contact me for more information)
      8. Acronyms
      9. Puns or “Punning” (For example pairing a rule with its term or issue that gives rise to it; ex: Gross Negligence)
      10. What has worked for you thus far. Let’s face it, part of the reason people are asking or wondering about alternate methods is likely due to the volume of material that must be memorized, the fact that the exam is painfully long, perhaps not passing your first time, etc. However, you have come this far and gone through how many years in the world of academia that – in my opinion – you should let practice exams, essays, and questions reveal if you need additional help or alternative methods to remember something. as they say, if it’s not broke, don’t fix it.

 

A Quick “Thank-You”

Thank you my dear bar examinees and law students who have rendered December my number 2 month since I got this website up and running this past April, both in terms of number of visitors and the number of unique/individual visitors.

Everyone have a happy and safe new year, and look for more from me next week, and don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter and/or follow this blog via e-mail! For those who are unaware, there is a Facebook Group for law students, graduates, Bar Examinees and professionals – if you would like to be added please feel free to contact me!

Best,

BBB

To my readers and Fellow examinees 

I just wanted to make a quick post and Explain  some of the inactivity on the website the past few Days. 

One of the 2 other contributors to this website recently lost a member of their family and given that we are good friends I had a little bit of the hiccup when it came to review and so on especially because our other contributor Is the cousin of the 1st so they are both dealing with that loss and One of them has actually opted to withdraw from the exam at this point.

While I certainly maintained my diligence and studying any extra time that I had I was doing my best to console them, But I wanted to make sure that I kept you guys in the loop so to speak and also let you know That while the exam is only weeks away I still hope to get any and all promise material to you guys buy this weekend I hope that you were all As rested as we can be at this juncture and Have at-least been able to put the other materials that we have uploaded and/or our discount codes and tips have been helpful! 

PS please forgive any and all grammatical mistakes  Such as the random words that are capitalized because I got a new phone last night and I don’t know why it’s doing that but it’s extremely irritating to me so I can only imagine that it’s extremely irritating to our view or maybe I have a pet peeve..either way.

Keep Calm, and Bar Prep On..

A little humor to keep gas in the engine…and make everyone stop and think about assumption of the risk.

DISCLAIMER: I do not own or purport to own the rights to the underlying pictures. They were sourced from an application which provides them for the purposes of creating memes.