Survey Results & Takeaways

For the 10-day period from the period of June 18th thru the last response which (I believe) was yesterday, June 28th.survey1

Takeaway 1: As you can see, you should not be panicking that you aren’t at a certain percentage by today, the vast majority of your peers are in the same boat – over 77% of them, if you want to go by this survey. Yes, I am aware the smaller the sample size the greater the margin of error, but working with the best data I have available, it certainly seems that the trend at the moment is 20-60%, which is a fair distance from the magic number or target percentage your program suggested.

survey2

Takeaway 2: In terms of the MBE, which are also fair game for the MEE, 50% of people that answered the survey found that property is the MBE topic they fear most, and that is understandable given the breadth of the topic. Somewhat surprisingly (at least, to me) Constitutional Law is 2nd and Evidence 3rd, suggesting those are the topics that I should focus on but also that – again, temporarily forgetting the margin of error – examinees can focus their studies on to score points in relation to other examinees, AND…

Takeaway 3: that you are not alone in how you feel. I can’t attempt to predict more without further data, such as if it is mortgages and the land sale contract type issues, auction/foreclosure stuff, covenants, servitudes, and easements, etc.

survey3

I think this one speaks for itself, but it is interesting to note that this question does not directly correlate with data on percentage complete of a bar prep program. But shake out those nerves and carry on bar preppers – it’s essentially the home stretch.

A Quick Post – Tips and Strategies

I received a question regarding strategies I have used, suggested in the past, or if I have any “original” strategies to suggest. At the moment I cannot think of any original strategies in particular, but I polled a couple of friends and I have a list of the non-traditional study methods that my friends and I have used.

      1. Mnemonics;
      2. Analogies (fictional – tv series, movies, books)
      3. Analogies (based on real life experiences)
      4. Short songs/nursery rhymes
      5. Altering song lyrics
        ^This can actually be  quite amusing and border on fun
      6. Identify your weak areas, take time to understand the rules, write them down in your own words, and read them aloud
      7. Group Study/Discussion (these days, very easy to do over the internet and great for people that lean towards auditory learning or have a keen memory for discussions)
      8. Acronyms
      9. Puns or “Punning” (For example pairing a rule with its term or issue that gives rise to it; ex: Gross Negligence)
      10. When in doubt, do what has worked for you thus far. Let’s face it, part of the reason people are asking or wondering about alternate methods is likely due to the volume of material that must be memorized, the fact that the exam is painfully long, perhaps not passing your first time, etc. However, you have come this far and gone through how many years in the world of academia that – in my opinion – you should let practice exams, essays, and questions reveal if you need additional help or alternative methods to remember something. As they say, if it’s not broke, don’t fix it.