Evidence and so on

This is the home stretch everyone! I will be uploading my hearsay flow chart today but be forewarned, I do not delve into “non-hearsay exemptions,” for spacial concerns as well as the confusing seemingly interchangeable terminology, which I think is more a result of your prep company/evidence lecturer preference, outline or material-writer preference, and law school professor preference. For example, I learned exemptions, exclusions, and exceptions in law school, but my bar prep company uses the terms in a different way.  In bar prep, exclusions and exceptions seem synonymous and are used to describe both exceptions requiring unavailability and where unavailability is immaterial; further, while my bar prep company refers to rule 801(d) exceptions as “non-hearsay exclusions,” while my 2014 copy of the FRE and some cursory research reveals the rule itself refers to them as exclusions and “Statements That Are Not Hearsay.” At the same time, a contributor and friend of mine using a different company and a secondary resource/study system stated that they (still on rule 801) used the terms non-hearsay and exemptions. I have therefore used both “not hearsay exclusions,” and “non-hearsay exemptions,” where i touch on 801. Simply bear in mind that there are uses or purposes for certain non-hearsay purposes (i.e. not offered to prove the truth of the matter asserted) such as effect on the listener, a statement offered to show the declarants mental state or state of mind, and/or impeachment purposes. Remember, this is intended to help you so if it causes confusion due to terminology ignore it or perhaps print it out and integrate your preferred terminology. If you have questions or feel there are errors, as always feel free to contact me. Last note: we do not need to know number rules for the Bar, as I understand, but I incorporated rule numbers where applicable for those of you who do prefer to go by rule number.

Evidence and so on

This is the home stretch everyone! I will be uploading my hearsay flow chart today but be forewarned, I do not delve into “non-hearsay exemptions,” for spacial concerns as well as the confusing seemingly interchangeable terminology, which I think is more a result of your prep company/evidence lecturer preference, outline or material-writer preference, and law school professor preference. For example, I learned exemptions, exclusions, and exceptions in law school, but my bar prep company uses the terms in a different way.  In bar prep, exclusions and exceptions seem synonymous and are used to describe both exceptions requiring unavailability and where unavailability is immaterial; further, while my bar prep company refers to rule 801(d) exceptions as “non-hearsay exclusions,” while my 2014 copy of the FRE and some cursory research reveals the rule itself refers to them as exclusions and “Statements That Are Not Hearsay.” At the same time, a contributor and friend of mine using a different company and a secondary resource/study system stated that they (still on rule 801) used the terms non-hearsay and exemptions. I have therefore used both “not hearsay exclusions,” and “non-hearsay exemptions,” where i touch on 801. Simply bear in mind that there are uses or purposes for certain non-hearsay purposes (i.e. not offered to prove the truth of the matter asserted) such as effect on the listener, a statement offered to show the declarants mental state or state of mind, and/or impeachment purposes, etc. Remember, this is intended to help you so if it causes confusion due to terminology ignore it or perhaps print it out and integrate your preferred terminology. If you have questions or feel there are errors, as always feel free to contact me. Last note: we do not need to know number rules for the Bar, as I understand, but I incorporated rule numbers where applicable for those of you who do prefer to go by rule number.

Forthcoming Materials & Update

To my dear fellow Bar Examinees and Followers:

I wanted to provide a belated update on my last post. Last week I became quite sick and subsequently fell slightly behind in my personal study schedule, which is why the study aids (the charts and diagrams mentioned in my last post have yet to be uploaded. However, rest assured that I am rapidly catching up and fully intend on getting them to you in the near future! For the time being, please know that some of our other contributors are working on other charts and diagrams. I know one person is doing a criminal law chart that starts with Specific vs. General Intent and Strict liability and flows on from there, and another person is wading through the waters of hearsay and its exceptions. Please accept my apologies and stay tuned! Also, make sure to learn from my mistake and get enough sleep before you get sick! Happy Studying and do not forget to download our property charts if you have not already done so. If you are in stress/panic mode or significantly behind, it may be a good idea to look into our post on Critical Pass Flashcards and/or Studicata if you need to drill and memorize rules.

Brief Bar Update

Hello Everyone! 

We just wanted to take the time to let you know additional materials – specifically on Contracts & Sales, Civil Procedure, and Torts are forthcoming! Some will be in the form of tables or diagrams, and others flow charts. Based on the feedback we did receive via Twitter, Instagram, and our contact page here, they will cover: damages (Contracts and Torts), Negligence, and jurisdictional charts for Civil Procedure. Stay tuned, and keep studying! 

If you haven’t done so already, look into Studicata and our discount code for their program here for information on their program and a user comment offering feedback on the program and here for an update and sale information. Also feel frew to look into Critical Pass here.

Happy hump-day!

Critical Pass Flash Cards – Discount & Free Shipping!

There are mixed perceptions when it comes to what were often referred to as “commercial outlines” or “commercial study aids” for use on finals in Law School. Some readers may have used them with varying degrees of success.

However, I have heard and read many positive things about Critical Pass Flash Cards and recently met up with a friend who had purchased them. I was impressed with the quality of the cards, and liked that they were color-coded because I have long used color-coding as a study tool. Further, if your bar prep course or understanding of a specific topic differs from what the card says, the back of the cards are lined and spacious enough for supplemental notes, writing a slightly different rule, noting a question to ask a former Professor or someone with your Bar Prep Course, etc. These flashcards cover the 7 MBE Topics on the Bar Exam; in other words, they can be beneficial and their material tested on any Bar Exam in the country, not just the UBE, which this website primarily focuses on.

The reason for this post is that Critical Pass is currently having a sale whereby you can receive both the physical flashcards and the Critical Pass Mobile Application. According to their homepage, this deal will currently save anyone who orders them $99.99 by giving immediate access to their mobile application with the purchase of their physical flashcards. On top of that deal, Critical Pass (as of today) is currently listing their sales price for their flashcards as $149.99, a further twenty dollars in savings from their original price of $169.99, and it is noted that their product has been updated for the July 2017  Bar Exams.

If you follow the first link to the Critical Pass homepage above and navigate through their website, you can read reviews from prior students who made use of Critical Pass, read about their methodology, F.A.Q’s, their disclaimer, and view samples.

I felt this information was worth sharing in a post due to the apparent bargain being offered now. While I would be lying if I said I was not considering making the purchase to supplement my studying, I like that the cards are informative, can be customized, that the mobile application is temporarily included (for one year) on top of the sale they seem to be having, do not interpret this post as a suggestion to spend additional money or an endorsement as to the efficacy of the product – I have no means by which to judge them at this time. I did feel that it was worth mentioning, though, and in line with the current focus of this website.

If you would like to purchase Critical Pass Flashcards, I would recommend doing so while the aforementioned sales are still available. If you are interested in making a purchase, my friend forwarded a link that he received after his purchase. Get (an additional) $10 off and free shipping here: http://criticalpass.refr.cc/X8NZ8GC 

Finally, in the interest of full disclosure and incorporating a disclaimer of our own, my friend does receive a $10.00 paypal credit for every person that uses the above extra discount and free shipping (I would assume the free shipping does not apply to any rushed shipping, probably only standard shipping). Finally, no current contributors to this website are employed by or affiliated with Critical Pass and the positive opinions expressed are my own, based on my observations, research, and the timing of their sales as well as the additional $10.00 discount and free shipping.

Any decision to purchase Critical Pass flashcards or other products of theirs are therefore your own and should be made after doing your own research. In the meantime, if anyone has used the cards in the past please feel free to comment your opinion on them via a comment or our “Contact” page.

Estates Diagram

Please note that I am aware of how small the chart appears in post format and will be looking into ways to resolve this issue, whether it actually results in having the full sized chart show appropriately or inserting a sort of shared dropbox where the files can be downloaded from. In the mean time, right click, select “save image as,” and once you have saved the image open it. It should be the appropriate size and if not, simply zoom in. Apologies for any inconvenience!

estates chart